The Journey of John Harrison's Marine Timekeeper

What was John Harrison's first attempt at a maritime timekeeper?

A. H1

B. H2

C. H3

D. H4

Where can you currently see the restored timepieces H1, H2, H3, and H4?

A. Royal Observatory in Greenwich

B. National Maritime Museum

C. British Museum

D. Science Museum

What does an H2 tag mean on a clock?

A. It displays 24-hour time format

B. It displays 12-hour time format

How is time expressed in the 24-hour notation?

A. hh:mm

B. hh:mm:ss

Answer:

John Harrison's first attempt at a maritime timekeeper was H1.

The restored timepieces H1, H2, H3, and H4 can currently be seen at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich.

An H2 tag on a clock means it displays the 12-hour time format.

Time in the 24-hour notation is expressed as hh:mm or hh:mm:ss.

The Story of John Harrison's Marine Timekeeper

John Harrison's journey to crack the longitude mystery and earn the £20,000 prize given by the British government led to the creation of the marine timekeeper. His first attempt, H1, was followed by H2, H3, and H4, all of which are now on display at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich.

The H2 tag on a clock signifies the display of time in the 12-hour format, distinguishing it from the 24-hour format indicated by H1. This subtle difference in notation can impact how time is perceived and understood.

By understanding the intricacies of clock notation and the significance of Harrison's timepieces, we can appreciate the dedication and innovation behind the quest for accurate timekeeping at sea. The legacy of the marine timekeeper continues to inspire and educate generations about the importance of precision in navigation and time measurement.

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